Seniors and Mental Illness

Older man in cafeThe month of May is Mental Health Month so it is very appropriate that we talk about mental illness as it relates to seniors. The National Council on Aging (NCOA) reports that one in four older Americans will experience some form of mental illness so this is not some rare occurrence we are talking about. Contrary to some negative stereotypes, it is not a normal part of aging to feel lonelier or more unhappy as people get older.

In an article published on May 4, the NCOA discussed the two major areas of concern: anxiety and depression. No one should have to suffer under the assumption that nothing can be done or that help is not available. If you or someone you know exhibits symptoms of anxiety or depression, it is important to seek help immediately.

There are many symptoms and diagnoses for anxiety. It is important not to “self-diagnose” any illness, but some symptoms to be on the alert for are panic attacks, nightmares, phobias or chronic worry about everyday activities. The nonprofit organization Mental Health America (MHA) has developed a free, anonymous online screening tool for anxiety. To be clear, this is not the same as a medical diagnosis, but some may find it helpful to use the screening results to start a conversation with their own physician.

Depression can also take many forms. You may notice in yourself or others symptoms such as poor sleep, extended periods of sadness, loss of enjoyment in everyday activities or loss of energy. Many articles have been written about depression creating a greater risk for suicide, but depression can also lead to an overall lower quality of life and even to physical health problems. Here again, MHA has developed an online screening tool for depression that people may find helpful in determining to seek professional help.

For people over 65, Medicare helps cover a wide range of mental health services including tests and visits with a physician, psychiatrist or social worker. Part D coverage can also help cover the costs of many medications prescribed to treat mental illness.

Although the month of May is designated as a time for heightened awareness of mental illness in our country, we should always be on the alert for symptoms in ourselves and in those we love. The stigma of the words “mental illness” have often caused people to avoid even discussing the issue. Just as with any other health issue, you should never hesitate to discuss your concerns with your family or you personal physician.

 

Author: Mike Mahoney

After over 30 years of helping North Idaho individuals and businesses select all types of insurance coverage, I am now focusing primarily on the Over 65 population. My specialty areas include Medicare Supplements, Medicare Advantage Plans, Part D Drug Plans, Final Expense, Dental and Travel insurance. If you also need coverage for your home, autos or business, I have associates on the North Idaho Insurance team that can quickly assist you.

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